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Techniques and Tips

Your Art Cravings, Satisfied

3 Ways to Feed Your Need for TextureArtists have voracious appetites for texture–for new ways of seeing marks appear on a surface and teasing out forms with different strokes. In Strokes of Genius 9: Creative Discoveries, I’ve found a feast for our senses. Texture pours off the page. Painters and illustrators use pen and ink, watercolor, pastel and more to hook us into their orbit and keep our eyes locked to their works.
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Drawing

Out and About as an Artist in the City

Make the Most of It With These SuppliesEnjoy the city as an urban artist! These new and notable products will guarantee you make the most of your time exploring the bustling setting around you.SOHO URBAN ARTIST LIGHTWEIGHT MAHOGANY FRENCH EASELThis top-rated French easel weighs less than 9 pounds! That’s 30 percent lighter than other French easels.
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Artist Profiles

Artist HQ: Emilie Lee, Putting Art Into #Vanlife

A Painter’s Life on the RoadMeet Emilie Lee, intrepid artist and wanderlust painter. She has walked away from big city life in New York City to embark on an artful life on the road.Her van is her mobile studio and the people, places and things she encounters become her painting subjects and impromptu inspirations.
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Drawing

Drawing Lessons from Michelangelo

Painter, Sculptor, Architect — Drawing United His GeniusIf the High Renaissance had a leading man, Michelangelo Buonarroti would be one of the last artists standing. He was almost more artistic myth than man and the root of all that creativity in painting, sculpting and architecture was drawing. So get to know the ropes with drawing lessons directly from Michelangelo himself and inspired by his works.
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Drawing

A Sucker for Architecture

Watercolor Art and Architecture of the CityArches, towers, doorways, bridges and vaulted ceilings — I love all aspects of architecture and engineering. And it was through these things that I first started to appreciate plein air painting.Before, when I was trying to understand what plein air was all about, I was sort of “meh” about the idea of going out of the studio to paint.
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Drawing

The Contrast Effect | Important Rules for Landscape Painting

The term “simultaneous contrast” was first used by French physicist Michel Eugene Chevreul to explain a phenomenon plaguing the dye works at the Gobelins Manufactory in Paris. He concluded that the visual perception of a color or value tone is profoundly affected by what lies next to it. This, along with other findings, was published in 1839 as “The Law of Simultaneous Colour Contrast” and has influenced generations of subsequent artists.
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